University of Southern California

Segil Lab

USC Stem Cell

Sidgmore Family Foundation gift to help hearing loss research

Graduate student Vincent Haoze Yu, Broad Clinical Fellow Rodrigo Martínez Monedero,  Michael Sidgmore, principal investigator Neil Segil and graduate student Louise Menendez in the Choi Family Therapeutic Screening Facility at the Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC (Photo courtesy of HSC News)

Graduate student Vincent Haoze Yu, Broad Clinical Fellow Rodrigo Martínez Monedero, Michael Sidgmore, principal investigator Neil Segil and graduate student Louise Menendez in the Choi Family Therapeutic Screening Facility at the Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC (Photo courtesy of HSC News)

There has always been one insurmountable problem related to hearing loss: When the sensory hair cells in the inner ear die, they don’t regenerate. These microscopic cells signal to the brain that it is hearing a noise and the fact that they do not regenerate is the reason that hearing loss is irreversible.

But Neil Segil, professor of research in the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, hopes that the research going on in his laboratory could provide real solutions for people with hearing loss, whether it be from aging, a genetic predisposition, or as a result of treatment with antibiotics or chemotherapy.

To read more, visit stemcell.usc.edu/2016/05/25/sidgmore-family-foundation-gift-to-help-hearing-loss-research.

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