University of Southern California

Segil Lab

USC Stem Cell

Lab publishes two papers in Development about Atoh1

he organ of Corti, the hearing organ of the inner ear, is made up of a single row of inner hair cells and three rows of outer hair cells (green), surrounded by supporting cells (purple). (Image by Yassan Abdolazimi and Neil Segil)

The organ of Corti, the hearing organ of the inner ear, is made up of a single row of inner hair cells and three rows of outer hair cells (green), surrounded by supporting cells (purple). (Image by Yassan Abdolazimi and Neil Segil)

Non-mammals such as birds can recover from deafness as quickly as humans can recover from a cut or bruise. In contrast, when humans and other mammals sustain damage to the inner ear’s sensory cells, the resulting hearing loss is permanent.

In two studies published in the journal Development, researchers from the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Neil Segil examined how a key gene, called Atoh1, underpins the development and potential regeneration of the inner ear’s sensory cells, which are known as hair cells.

To read more, visit stemcell.usc.edu/2016/07/01/usc-stem-cell-researchers-listen-for-clues-about-how-the-gene-atoh1-enables-hearing.

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